Coronavirus death count
Death count

Swine Flu (H1N1)

212 469 deaths

60 800 000 confirmed cases

Swine influenza is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. Influenza viruses that commonly circulate in swine are called “swine influenza viruses” or “swine flu viruses.” Like human influenza viruses, there are different subtypes and strains of swine influenza viruses. The main swine influenza viruses circulating in U.S. pigs in recent years have been, swine triple reassortant (tr) H1N1 influenza virus, trH3N2 virus, and trH1N2 virus.

The virus was first identified in Mexico in April 2009. It became known as swine flu because it's similar to flu viruses that affect pigs. It spread rapidly from country to country because it was a new type of flu virus that few young people were immune to. Overall, the outbreak was not as serious as originally predicted, largely because many older people were already immune to it. Most cases in the UK were relatively mild, although there were some serious cases. The relatively small number of cases that led to serious illness or death were mostly in children and young adults – particularly those with underlying health problems – and pregnant women. On 10 August 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the pandemic officially over. "Swine flu" now

The A/H1N1pdm09 virus is now one of the seasonal flu viruses that circulate each winter. If you've had flu in the last few years, there's a chance it was caused by this virus. As many people now have some level of immunity to the A/H1N1pdm09 virus, it's much less of a concern than it was during 2009 to 2010. The symptoms are the same as other types of common flu. They're usually mild and pass within 1 to 2 weeks. But as with all types of flu, some people are at higher risk of serious illness, particularly those with underlying health problems. The regular flu jab will usually protect people who are at a higher risk of becoming severely ill. A vaccine programme for children has also been introduced, which aims to protect children and reduce their ability to infect others.

Death count

SARS - Severe acute respiratory syndrome

774 deaths

8 098 confirmed cases

SARS was a relatively rare disease; at the end of the epidemic in June 2003, the incidence was 8422 cases with a case-fatality rate of 11%.
The case-fatality ratio ranges from 0% to 50% depending on the age group of the patient.[5] Patients under 24 were least likely to die (less than 1%); those 65 and older were most likely to die (over 55%).

SARS is caused by a member of the coronavirus family of viruses (the same family that can cause the common cold). It is believed the 2003 epidemic started when the virus spread from small mammals in China.
When someone with SARS coughs or sneezes, infected droplets spray into the air. You can catch the SARS virus if you breathe in or touch these particles. The SARS virus may live on hands, tissues, and other surfaces for up to several hours in these droplets. The virus may be able to live for months or years when the temperature is below freezing.
While the spread of droplets through close contact caused most of the early SARS cases, SARS might also spread by hands and other objects the droplets has touched. Airborne transmission is a real possibility in some cases. Live virus has even been found in the stool of people with SARS, where it has been shown to live for up to 4 days.
With other coronaviruses, becoming infected and then getting sick again (reinfection) is common. This may also be the case with SARS.
Symptoms usually occur about 2 to 10 days after coming in contact with the virus. In some cases, SARS started sooner or later after first contact. People with active symptoms of illness are contagious. But it is not known for how long a person may be contagious before or after symptoms appear.

Death count

Ebola - Western African Ebola virus epidemic

11 323 deaths

28 646 confirmed cases

Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever) is a severe, often fatal illness, with a death rate of up to 90% caused by Ebola virus, a member of the filovirus family.
The Ebola virus can cause severe viral haemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) outbreaks in humans with a case fatality rate of up to 90%. There are four main subtypes of Ebola virus in the African Region: Bundibugyo, Ivory Coast, Sudan and Zaire. The Bundibugyo, Sudan and Zaire species have all been associated with large Ebola HF outbreaks in the Region.
bola HF symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding.
The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. People can become exposed via direct contact with blood and/or secretions of an infected person. Friends and family members are at an elevated risk when caring for the infected person through close contact with such secretions.
Health care workers have also been frequently infected in medical facilities. No specific treatment or vaccine is yet available for Ebola HF but new promising drug therapies are being evaluated.

Death count

Spanish flu

100 000 000 deaths

500 000 000 confirmed cases

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is not universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide during 1918-1919.


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